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Essay News Poem Review Short Story

2021 | Short Story

Queen Victoria In The Basement, shortlisted

My short story, Queen Victoria In The Basement, has been shortlisted in the White Review short story competition. The story is set in the basement of the Lahore Museum. I was inspired to write it after seeing the statue of Queen Victoria in the Armoury and the guard who was looking after it.

Dear Mr Chairman,

Sir,

Yesterday, after I switched on the spotlight so that you could see the Queen properly, you covered your nose so I wanted to explain why there’s a smell.

Please, allow me to introduce my good self to you. I’m Benazir Mirza (also known as Aspro), and for ten years now, I’ve been working as guard and caretaker in the basement of our prestigious Lahore Museum. But more than that, I’m a devoted sevadari to Her Majesty, Queen Victoria.

Sir, I want to tell you everything – how after Partition the Queen was dragged from Charing Cross Road, where she’d sat under the shade of a marble pavilion since 1904, and dumped here in the basement. However, I don’t want to lie and pretend that I haven’t been watching you for many years. I see you every morning when I’m taking my tea break at 11.30 am at Khalid’s kiosk and you drive through the gates of the Museum. You sit at the back, on the left, with your window rolled up. I even know your number plate…

www.thewhitereview.org/fiction/queen-victoria-in-the-basement

2021 | Short Story

A Safe Place

Langata Prison, Nairobi, December 2008

Kay slept on a thin mattress with a torn blanket to cover her. In the corner of her cell was a steel bucket and a brown sponge for wiping both her body and the rough walls finished with gloss grey. The bulb hanging from the corrugated iron roof was never turned on. The only light coming in was through the barbed wire in the narrow ventilation gap between the roof and walls. Her cell, at the end of a long, wide corridor, had a small internal window with bars which overlooked the passageway lined with other cells on either side. These were shared by five or six women. Once a day, before they were marched out to the fields, they ate together in the passage seated on low stools. Kay slept and ate on her own.

‘Oi,’ she  shouted, ‘there’s a cockroach in here.’

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2021 | Short Story

Poached Eggs

‘Marry me Nuru,’ Jaffer said in his precise, measured tone, ‘and together we’ll build our future in this new independent Republic.’

He was standing opposite Nurbanu’s typewriter and she was sitting at her desk at the Chambers where she worked. She’d met him several months earlier when he’d come in to meet one of the lawyers and they’d struck up a friendship. Nuru had a Pitman’s Secretarial Diploma and a driver’s licence from the first Ladies Driving School in Nairobi. She felt with her natural beauty and qualifications she deserved the care of a man who would cherish her. Jaffer was a self-made, successful business man. He was short, dark and stocky and less educated than Nuru, but she accepted his proposal because he was someone who appreciated her; why else would he speak about her and Kenyan politics in the same sentence?

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2021 | Short Story

The Tabla Player

Saam – The First Clap

I whistle raag Bhairavi and rap both tablas, and check the tautness of the rough leather straps, and tap the tablas once and twice, and listen to their tone and echo, separately and together, and using a small hammer I strike the straps and edges of each drum, one at a time, rotating and knocking at the pegs until every stroke gives off an even tone, and with  the heel of my hand I apply pressure to the drums in a rapping, sliding motion so that the pitch changes and matches that of the tanpura humming in the background, and I adjust the wooden block between the drum and the leather strips and move it up and down and along the side to regulate the tension of the drums…

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2021 | Short Story

This One’s Not For Us

I rolled down my window and watched the street vendors stroll between the stationary cars, tankers, matatus and buses. I had a strange impulse to drive straight into the car in front, just for the satisfaction of knowing I’d made an impact for once. I gripped the steering wheel.

Dilip and I were stuck on Mombasa Road driving to the city center of Nairobi from our offices near the Jomo Kenyatta Airport. We’d just passed the golf course on our left and the old East African railway station on our right. I fiddled with the knobs for the indicator lights and switched off the engine.

A street seller sidled up to the car carrying Kenyan flags of all sizes, the black, red and white fabric flapping around his face.

“Madam, do you need flags, sunglasses or a photo of the president?” he asked…

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2021 | Short Story

This one’s not for us

Short story in Dress You Up Anthology. New Lit Salon Press.

Dress You Up is an anthology like no other. The twelve diverse stories in this collection speak to the multiple ways in which fashion is more than just the clothes we wear. There will be no frivolous yarns about fashion here—those tales can be found in other closets. This Capsule Collection of Fashionable Fiction illustrates how the clothing and accessories we wear or covet often reflect past memories, present challenges, or future hopes and dreams. The stories focus on themes such as trauma and healing, perception and identity, love and loss, hopes and dreams…

newlitsalonpress.com/product/dress-you-up

2020 | Short Story

Sugra

Short story published in The Mechanics Institute Review, Birbeck, University of London.

To tell you the truth, I don’t like to remember that day, or the days that followed, but the memory of it is fresh. I can recall that hot afternoon vividly and in detail, when that man showed up at our doorstep. I suppose I could blame him or my parents for what happened later, even though you could say they had nothing to do with it…

mironline.org/sugra

2020 | Short Story

A Man of Talent

A short story published by Out Of Print.

Dr Patel knew that a man of his talent could not remain Deputy Head of the HR Department at Amber Investments for the rest of his life. He was destined for greater heights. As he manoeuvred his Toyota Corolla through Nairobi’s traffic on Waiyaki Way, en route to the office, the question of how to impress the Directors was uppermost in his mind. A few people had mentioned he was ready for promotion, though of course he’d dismissed the idea with a modest wave.

He rested his elbow on the open window and drummed lightly on the steering wheel, trying to ignore the music blaring from the packed matatu in the next lane, and the exhaust fumes of the diesel tanker in front. Before long, he wouldn’t have to drive, he’d be driven.

Ahead, the lights changed to green. He jammed his foot on the accelerator as he circled the roundabout and honked at a car trying to overtake from the left. The lights turned red, he braked and just missed a vendor who dashed across the road, carrying a board with fake designer glasses…

www.outofprintmagazine.co.in/archive/december_2020-issue/farah-ahamed_a-man-of-talent.html

2019 | Short Story

Longlisted for CBC Short Story Award (Canada)

Farah Ahamed has made the 2019 CBC Short Story Prize longlist for We’re Watching You.

A few years ago, I lived in Kampala. One of the things that struck me was the large number of Kaloli marabou storks, perched on the roofs and treetops, like sentries guarding the city. I felt they were policing me. At the same time, a friend was going through a breakup after an affair. The two ideas somehow came together when I started working on the story.

While writing, it occurred to me to experiment with second person pronouns. I thought the use of ‘You,’ could offer a certain accusatory tone, while ‘We,’ could give a ‘holier than thou,’ loftiness. I also wanted to play with the idea of a Greek tragedy; where the passivity of the chorus is set up as distinct from the activity of the main character. In my story, while the tragic protagonist acts in defiance of the limits set by society, the chorus expresses judgement of her, and its verdict ultimately pushes her over the edge.

www.cbc.ca/books/literaryprizes/we-re-watching-you-by-farah-ahamed-1.5074251

2015 | Short Story

Life Will Be Better

Short story, Life Will Be Better, finalist in the Out of Print/DNA Competition (India).

I rolled down my window and watched the street vendors stroll between the stationary cars, tankers, matatus and buses. I had a strange impulse to drive straight into the car in front, just for the satisfaction of knowing I’d made an impact for once. I gripped the steering wheel.

Dilip and I were stuck on Mombasa Road driving to the city centre of Nairobi from our offices near the Jomo Kenyatta Airport. We’d just passed the golf course on our left and the old East African railway station on our right. A street seller sidled up to the car carrying Kenyan flags of all sizes; the black, red and white fabric flapping around his face. “Madam, you need flags, sunglasses or a photo of the President?” he asked.

I shook my head, avoided his gaze and looked at the traffic ahead…

www.dnaindia.com/lifestyle/report-dna-out-of-print-short-fiction-contest-life-will-be-better-2147582